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Author Topic: scoby  (Read 2606 times)

Offline christinap966

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scoby
« on: April 13, 2013, 04:28:27 PM »
Hey friends, I have sadly neglected my kombucha for a few months and my scoby has become a giant! It has remained in the tea, covered with a cheese cloth in a cabinet, my question is the scoby still good regardless of how long its been sitting in the same brew? I just want to be sure since I am dealing with yeast and bacteria :) Thanks!

Offline asiag854

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Re: scoby
« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2013, 12:57:59 PM »
I left mine in it's brew for about 3 weeks and then started a new batch and it was fine.   You might be able to separate it if it's too large.  I know that you can cut it up into peices and give them away to friends and family who are interested in doing their own brewing.  There is a book called "The Art of Fermentation" that has some really good tips on brewing kombucha.  Good luck!

Offline heatherc308

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Re: scoby
« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2013, 12:18:12 AM »
Hello, I have quite a bit of experience with brewing Kombucha and there are several things to note. First of all, if your life is getting busy and/or you are going out of town, put your scoby in the refrigerator to stop the fermentation. You can leave your scoby in the fridge for several months. If you have left your scoby OUT to ferment for 3 months, I can bet that that particular batch of tea is kaput, no bueno, sorry lady:( BUT the good news is that your scoby is probably renewable! You should make a new batch of tea with sugar in a clean glass jar and then take the NEWEST scoby that is on top, (you should find that your scoby has a mother, on bottom, and several new babies on top, and the newest are usually the healthiest.) Discard all of the black parts and brown scobys and keep the one that is hopefully a light golden tan color. (If your scoby has mold, DISARD!!!-you can look up photos online for pics of moldy scobies) I would put this newest scoby on the top of your brew with just a little of the old mixture. NOW, here is the thing, since your kombucha is a mixture of BOTH bacteria AND yeast, often when left unattended or the temperature rapidly rises or drops the ratio gets out of balance. Meaning that if your first new batch of Kombucha tastes funny or does not seem to "fizz", (they can stay flat), you probably have an overgrowth of one, and an undergrowth of the other. NOT TO WORRY, this will naturally balance itselft out IF you are patient and can brew another batch and another batch and another batch until it balances out and you are happy with the taste of your brew. If this seems like a lot of work, (and it is basically a patience issue), I have MANY scobies and babies going and I would be happy to bring you a fresh scoby:) Sometimes it is good to start fresh if you are having more than one bad batch in a row. But next time, refrigerate and just take it out when you can find the time again. BEST OF LUCK! xo

Offline heatherc308

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Re: scoby
« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2013, 12:21:26 AM »
Oh, and also, if your first batch is drinkable but not favorable, you can always do a second ferment with fruit or ginger or whatever you like and that will give it more flavor and take away that kick you can get in the back of your throat if it gets to "vinegary" and make it more "fizzy" too. Just pour the kombucha in a glass jar with the peices of desired fruit and seal air tight for 3-5 days out in room temp. Then drink and refrigerate. YUM! xo

Offline Elizabeth

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Re: scoby
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2013, 05:46:33 PM »
I am a kombuch/scobi virgin.
Can you more experienced peeps point in a good direction to find out how to get started?
Also, Ed mentioned in an NC lecture that he makes it with honey, anyone know anything more about this?
Thanks!

Natural Chef, 2011
Nutrition Consultant, 2015

Offline David

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Re: scoby
« Reply #5 on: May 02, 2013, 02:26:37 PM »
I have been brewing Kombucha for a while now. I would not call myself an expert, but I have learned a few things. If you are new at brewing kombucha start simple with your tea blend. I make it 2 gallons at a time and my blend is usually 4 black tea bags to 12 green tea bags with 1-1.5 cups of sugar per gallon of liquid. Depending on your taste preference will determine how long your let it ferment. I usually go anywhere from 14-20 days. If you want, you can add fruit and spices in a second ferment (portioning the kombucha out into smaller containers (GLASS WITH PLASTIC OR GLASS LIDS. NO METAL!!!!) and leaving the kombucha (sealed) for an additional 3-5 days).

If you think your Scobies might be contaminated or just want to be on the safe side, wash them in vinegar. It will kill bacteria (yes also the good stuff) s it might take a little while for your batch to get back to its original strength.

Happy brewing!!! :)

 


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