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Author Topic: Research related to cancer prevention and diet  (Read 1652 times)

Offline laelg653

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Research related to cancer prevention and diet
« on: October 05, 2015, 10:28:54 AM »
Hiya,

I wanted to share this article that came across my desk today.  http://www.independentsciencenews.org/health/why-cancer-research-has-stalled/

It questions the predominant theory that many forms of cancer are caused by genetic predisposition and/or a series of mutations in cells caused initiated by a catalyst of a toxin.  Professor T. Colin Campbell a cancer biologist and nutrition researcher at Cornell University questions this theory based upon his research that indicates that over consumption of animal based proteins are a larger catalyst for cancer development.  In the linked article, Campbell states that "although mutations prime cells for cancer development, further progression to diagnosable cancer is typically nutritionally controlled. No mutations are necessary."

It's a quick and interesting read  - worth a look.

Offline Nori

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Re: Research related to cancer prevention and diet
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2015, 11:29:18 AM »
Interestingly,  Dr Campbell uses same thesis he used in his China Study.  As we discussed in FON 101, the quality of protein is important to consider. 


And for another point of view, you may be interested to read Denise Minger's critique of that thesis. 


http://www.westonaprice.org/book-reviews/the-china-study-by-t-colin-campbell/



Nori M. Hudson, BA, MS
Instructor, Bauman College, Berkeley
Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition by and Registered with NANP
Certified Diet Counselor, Nutrition Educator,  Nutrition Consultant, and Nutrition Teacher through Bauman College

Offline laelg653

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Re: Research related to cancer prevention and diet
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2015, 11:52:18 AM »
Thanks for posting all the details of his thesis.   I've heard of the China Study but never looked into it.  When reading the article I posted, I was interested in finding out more about the amount of protein that would be considered healthy for different individuals.  Last year I attended a conference at Stanford on food and sustainability and a lot of time was spent on the excess amount of protein that Americans eat.  My family and I are on a primarily paleo diet, and though we eat protein from organic/pastured animals, I do worry what "too much" might be or what just enough might be for us. 

Another thing I thought was interesting about this article is that it brings to attention that diet can be a powerful ally in cancer prevention. 

Offline Nori

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Re: Research related to cancer prevention and diet
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2015, 04:36:21 PM »
The amount of protein we need is so individual. But with enough fat, which helps with its digestion, and 3-4 servings of vegetables, protein is not the enemy. 


I happen  to eat Paleo style with occasional grains.  The key for my health has been to eat fattier animal protein rather than using the "lean protein" idea.  Traditional hunting cultures would have selected the older (hence, fatter) members of the herds to eat. 


Eating your ideal weightided by 2 to get ounces of protein has been a good guide for me and my clients. 



Nori M. Hudson, BA, MS
Instructor, Bauman College, Berkeley
Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition by and Registered with NANP
Certified Diet Counselor, Nutrition Educator,  Nutrition Consultant, and Nutrition Teacher through Bauman College

Offline laelg653

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Re: Research related to cancer prevention and diet
« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2015, 11:33:15 AM »
Hi Nori,

We mostly eat chicken and pork because those are the meats my daughters are most willing to eat.  I do include beef on occasion.  I don't mind eating the fattier cuts of meat and my daughters really like it.  Thanks for the protein guideline - so to be sure I'm understanding - divide my ideal weight by 2 to get the number of protein ounces to eat per day?

Thanks!

Offline Nori

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Re: Research related to cancer prevention and diet
« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2015, 09:48:14 AM »
Yes, that formula seems to fit most people in terms of protein needs. It can go higher if one is athletic.


On the matter of feeding your children, I am (now) a fan of Karen Le Billon, who wrote FRENCH KIDS EAT EVERYTHING and GETTING TO YUM, the latter being a very practical way for non-French parents to entice a wider food band width in their children.   


And you might want to soak pork in apple cider vinegar and/or serve it with sauerkraut. Beverly Rubik did live blood cell analysis on folks eating pork with and without these sour foods and saw pork worked better in the body using them.   Her article can be found here: http://www.westonaprice.org/modern-diseases/how-does-pork-prepared-in-various-ways-affect-the-blood-2/

Nori M. Hudson, BA, MS
Instructor, Bauman College, Berkeley
Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition by and Registered with NANP
Certified Diet Counselor, Nutrition Educator,  Nutrition Consultant, and Nutrition Teacher through Bauman College

Offline jodi f.

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Re: Research related to cancer prevention and diet
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2015, 12:22:51 PM »
To Nori's excellent suggestions, I'd like to add that, in addition to including fatty meats, organ meats should also be on the menu. They contain important vitamins and amino acid ratios that muscle does not. Ditto for long-simmered bone broths.


As for T. Colin Campbell, please DO read Denise Minger. I've read some of his research and have seen for myself some of the contradictions between his actual findings and what he concludes from them.

Offline laelg653

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Re: Research related to cancer prevention and diet
« Reply #7 on: October 13, 2015, 08:59:21 AM »
Thank you. I just read the Weston Price article on marinating fresh pork. I guess I better start buying ACV in bulk!  We usually eat fresh pork about twice a week so I'll definitely start marinating. How would you treat fresh sausage?  Also marinate?


Offline Nori

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Re: Research related to cancer prevention and diet
« Reply #8 on: October 13, 2015, 03:34:20 PM »
Yep.

Nori M. Hudson, BA, MS
Instructor, Bauman College, Berkeley
Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition by and Registered with NANP
Certified Diet Counselor, Nutrition Educator,  Nutrition Consultant, and Nutrition Teacher through Bauman College

Offline laelg653

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Re: Research related to cancer prevention and diet
« Reply #9 on: October 13, 2015, 03:38:18 PM »
Hi Jodi,

Thanks for the tips on organ meats.  I've read about the benefits of including organ meats into the diet since they contain other nutrients unavailable in the more standard cuts.  I've tried liver a couple of times with zero success at home.  I do make bone broth from chicken bones on the regular though and include it into soups, stews and when sauteing greens. 


Offline Nori

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Re: Research related to cancer prevention and diet
« Reply #10 on: October 13, 2015, 03:42:25 PM »
Try to get some heart, if possible, as it is just lean muscle meat.  Liver pate is a pretty easy way to entice the picky eater (see other posts on this topic). Putting a smidgen of liver into ground meat with plenty of savory herbs and garlic can camouflage.   Put ketchup on top for a final touch. 
Nori M. Hudson, BA, MS
Instructor, Bauman College, Berkeley
Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition by and Registered with NANP
Certified Diet Counselor, Nutrition Educator,  Nutrition Consultant, and Nutrition Teacher through Bauman College

 


anything