Bauman College Programs

Author Topic: Nutritional yeast  (Read 21397 times)

Offline jodi f.

  • Curriculum Consultant
  • Staff
  • *****
  • Posts: 2789
Nutritional yeast
« on: August 28, 2007, 04:26:06 PM »
I hate to admit it, but I'm not a big fan of nutritional yeast--the flavor, anyway. But I want to start including it in my diet on a regular basis as a means of providing nutrients from food and not from pills. Does anyone have any recipes that incorporate it into something yummy? I know it goes well on popcorn, but I have a little problem with popcorn that requires a 12-step program, and most of my clients shouldn't be eating it either. I can mix it into smoothies, but then I have a smoothie I don't really like, so I'm not inclined to make them. What I need is some alchemical magic. Any and all input would be greatly appreciated.

Offline Jesse Miner

  • Alumni
  • ***
  • Posts: 21
    • Jesse Miner - Vegan Personal Chef
Re: Nutritional yeast
« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2007, 07:14:02 AM »
Pesto

2 cups basil
1 cup parsley
2 cloves garlic
3 tablespoons pine nuts
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup nutritional yeast
6 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

In food processor, thoroughly blend basil, parsley, garlic, pine nuts, salt and nutritional yeast. While processor is running, slowly add olive oil until well combined.

Delicious in any recipe you would use pesto. For a nutritional and flavor powerhouse, I dilute the pesto with 1/2 cup water or veg stock and toss with cooked quinoa, chopped sun-dried tomatoes and halved cherry tomatoes. I can't get enough of pesto during the summer when basil is plentiful.

Jesse
Jesse Miner
Vegan Personal Chef
San Francisco, CA
jesse@chefjesseminer.com
www.chefjesseminer.com
650-274-8089

Offline jodi f.

  • Curriculum Consultant
  • Staff
  • *****
  • Posts: 2789
Re: Nutritional yeast
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2007, 12:22:59 PM »
Oh, god, Jesse, it all sounds great-----except for the yeast. I'll try it, I promise. And I'll pass this along to a client today. Thank you so much.

Offline Sondra Barrett

  • Former Bauman College Faculty Member
  • *
  • Posts: 106
    • Sondra Barrett  Mystic Molecules
Re: Nutritional yeast
« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2007, 12:49:01 PM »
I'm not a fan of nutritional yeast either.  In fact, sometimes I have reactions to it.  Nonetheless,here's a great recipe by way of Patty James - its called red pepper no cheese dip.
1 medium red pepper, not hot
1 1/2 cups raw cashews
1/3 c nutritional yeast
1/4 c sesame seeds
1/2 c water
1 TB soy sauce
Put all in blender until smooth.  Let it set up for a few hours in the fridge.  Its good for a few days. 

Obviously you can vary the proportions to change the taste.  Next time I make it I'm going to omit the yeast and add more sesame and maybe some garlic.  But this was very tasty. 
javascript:void(0);
Bon appetit!

PhD, Biochemistry, University of Illinois Medical School
Post-doctoral fellow, Immunology-hematology UCSF
Teaching bodymind medicine since 1988.
Mentor:School Garden Network"cooking from the garden"
Teaching NE and NC at Bauman since 2007

Offline trudy

  • Faculty
  • ****
  • Posts: 11
    • The Healing Hearth
Re: Nutritional yeast
« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2007, 09:53:33 PM »
This is a recipe from the Natural Chef Program at Bauman.
It is really a wonderful appetizer.

Butter or coconut oil for greasing pan
1 medium onion, peeled and coarsely chopped
1 large potato, peeled and diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup sunflower seeds, raw, unsalted
1/2 cup warm pure water
1/2 cup olive oil
1/2 cup whole wheat flour, or barley, oat or quinoa flour
1/2 cup nutritional yeast
1/4 cup Tamari soy sauce
1 1/2 teaspoons dried herbs of choice (sage, basil, oregano, marjoram)
organic butter or coconut oil for greasing loaf pans

1.   Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Oil 2 small 3x6 inch loaf pans.

2.   Process all the ingredients in a food processor or blender until very smooth.

3.   Pour the mixture into prepared pans. Bake 40 minutes, or until set. Cool thoroughly on a rack. Flavor is most fully developed when made a day or two ahead.

4.   To serve, loosen loaves from pans with a knife and invert onto serving plates or plastic wrap. Wrap well in plastic to store.

5.   May be stored in refrigerator for up to 2 weeks; in freezer for up to 3 months.

6.   Variations:
tablespoons fresh herbs may be used in place of dried herbs.
Before baking, cover the top of the pate with coarsely ground black pepper and a sprinkling of dried whole rosemary leaves.
Trudy Schafer, M.A.
Natural Chef

Offline Jesse Miner

  • Alumni
  • ***
  • Posts: 21
    • Jesse Miner - Vegan Personal Chef
Re: Nutritional yeast
« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2007, 11:06:55 PM »
Oh, god, Jesse, it all sounds great-----except for the yeast. I'll try it, I promise. And I'll pass this along to a client today. Thank you so much.
Just to be clear, I am talking about the yellow flaky nutritional yeast which has a slightly nutty and cheesy flavor. Not to be confused with brewer's yeast, which is a powder that has a distinctly bitter unpleasant taste to me. It gets confusing as I have seen both referred to as nutritional yeast.

Jesse
Jesse Miner
Vegan Personal Chef
San Francisco, CA
jesse@chefjesseminer.com
www.chefjesseminer.com
650-274-8089

Offline jodi f.

  • Curriculum Consultant
  • Staff
  • *****
  • Posts: 2789
Re: Nutritional yeast
« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2007, 11:47:12 AM »
Thank you Trudy and Sondra, I'll try both of those. Trudy, do you think any of the B's are destroyed in the cooking? And Jesse, I've got Frontier Nutritional Yeast. If there's another one you like better, do please let me know. But I've just discovered that I don't hate this yeast when I mix it in with a little Strauss yogurt and a drip of maple syrup. But if all these more savory recipes work for my clients, that would work out much better, especially for those sensitive to dairy.

Offline Marlina E

  • Associate Director
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 1812
    • Bauman College Online
Re: Nutritional yeast
« Reply #7 on: August 31, 2007, 10:09:12 AM »
It appears to me in review of this chart:
http://www.dietobio.com/vegetarisme/en/vit_chart.html

..that heat does destroy some B vitamins.

Cooking and heat tend to destory alot of vitamins, so although the recipe may not be "ideal" as a source of high B vitamin concentration from the nutritional yeast, I would assume that there are still good benefits from the product.  For therapeutic use, certainly the pesto would be a better choice to provide the highest amount of intact B's to the body.
BA Environmental Studies UCSB
Nutrition Consultant

Offline MiraD

  • Alumni
  • ***
  • Posts: 648
    • Grains&More
Re: Nutritional yeast
« Reply #8 on: September 13, 2007, 09:48:23 AM »
One of my favorite ways to use nutritional yeast is to make my own vegetarian soup base.

1 1/3 C. nutritional yeast flakes
1 T. onion powder
1/2 t. turmeric
2 t. garlic powder
1/2 t. celery seed
2 t. dried parsley
2 t. sea salt
1 T. paprika

Blend together in a blender until ingredients are fine consistency. 

I use 1 heaping teaspoon per cup of water.  I think it's pretty tasty.

Offline DoriF

  • Alumni
  • ***
  • Posts: 38
Re: Nutritional yeast
« Reply #9 on: October 14, 2007, 05:27:30 PM »
I make this all the time:

Take 2 or 2 tomatoes and cut them in half, not length wise, but so you have two rounded halves. Cut the bottoms off so they stand up. Put them on a baking pan and on top of the tomatos put butter, salt, pepper, basil, and cover with nutritional yeast. Broil for 5 minutes or until tops are golden brown. I'm telling you, you will LOVE nutritional yeast. It comes out almost like a bread crumb coating. I sometimes eat this more than once a week because it's so simple (and good for you). I put the tomatoes over grains or you can serve them with pasta or quinoa...the possibilities are endless! :) Enjoy!
« Last Edit: October 14, 2007, 05:31:22 PM by DoriF »

Offline jodi f.

  • Curriculum Consultant
  • Staff
  • *****
  • Posts: 2789
Re: Nutritional yeast
« Reply #10 on: October 22, 2007, 03:11:06 PM »
Mmmmm, the tomato dish sounds good. I'll try it next year when tomatoes are back in season. I think you guys up there still have some, but we've already had a little snow here (Tehachapi) and a couple of freezes, so the local tomatoes are gone.

I haven't done any cooking with the yeast yet and this is mainly because I like my breakfast concoction so much. I call it "Yeasty Goo", and a couple of clients who have tried it love it, too.

It's a tablespoon of yeast, a serving of Vital Scoop (or the Power version, which is 1-2Tbs. ground flax, 1 serving Whey Cool, and 1/2 -1 serving greens powder), mixed with some yogurt, vanilla extract and molasses or maple syrup (I've expanded on my previous recipe). It mixes up very thick, hence the "goo" part of the name.

Obviously this is a smoothie base, too, and I also sometimes add some fruit to it. Anyway, I'm happy for now. Yummy and quick. My biggest problem is that I have to mix up a separate batch for my kitten because she will not leave me alone when I'm eating this; I literally can't keep her out of my bowl. (I don't sweeten hers.)

Offline PaulaB

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 22
Re: Nutritional yeast
« Reply #11 on: October 30, 2007, 09:34:26 AM »
I love "Nutritional Yeast" on almost anything or nothing, straight out of the container.
Years ago I tried "Brewers Yeast" and just about gagged!  It was bitter and tasted awful.  I had no idea why they tasted so different until I did a paper for my N.E. class on Depression and researched Nutritional Yeast as a valuable dietary supplement for depression.  Rather than hunt up my research info now, I just looked up "Brewers Yeast" on the Internet and found thissimple description of both Brewers and Nutritional Yeasts: (I don't necessarily take their nutrient information as gospel, but the general idea is there) http://network.bestfriends.org/vegeat/news/2288.html 
Actually, the only way I do NOT like Nutritional Yeast is in a fruit smoothie!  Now, give me an avocado and I'll make you some stellar guacamole!
Also, I never heat Nutritional Yeast.  I use it as my main condiment at the table, alongside the flax seed of course!
My cat also gets in my face whenever she smells Nutritional Yeast, and when my dog was going through a fussy stage I put some N.Y. on her food... Yep, we all get our daily share of "N.Y"  around here. 
« Last Edit: October 30, 2007, 10:23:58 AM by PaulaB »

Offline blujay

  • Alumni
  • ***
  • Posts: 331
    • Herb'n Culture.com
Re: Nutritional yeast
« Reply #12 on: February 03, 2008, 12:31:46 AM »
One thing I would like to remind everyone about, is the idea that nutritional yeast is a super food (or booster food). Its very concentrated, so by nature you don't want eat alot of it, otherwise it gets wasted, or can cause other complications. Say it with me, "Less is More!". (which could be a blessing to those who don't like the taste)

Another thing, I'm not aware of any "raw nutritional yeast" (unless you would like eat bakers yeast), so brewers yeast has been heat treated. Usually it is spray dried in a heated dehydrator (alot like powdered milk). This is important to kill any left over living yeast and bacteria so that it can remain shelf stable. So in accordance with Marlina, heat does break down the B-vitamins and other nutritional properties. But Nutritional yeast is so high in these vitamins that the drying process leaves a substantial amount of vitamins. But I would avoid re-heating it to high temperatures.

Another concern I have about the heat treating of N.Y. is the conversion of the massive amounts of glutamic acid naturally found yeast, into a toxic form of L-glutamic acid (other wise know as Monosodium-glutamate, aka MSG the infamous excitotoxin ). One of the leading manufacturers of N.Y. (Red star) is a subsidiary of Le Saffre, a French based company that is the worlds largest manufacturer of yeast and yeast extracts, used as nutritional supplements, flavor enhancers, dough conditioners, and fermentation catalysts.(http://www.lesaffre.com/en/health-nutrition/human-health-nutrition/food-supplements.html), which a leader in the production of "flavor enhancers" (read food additives). So my brain cells just made the spark of connection. The same companies that makes nutritional yeast, also makes "yeast extracts", "autolysed yeast extract", "hydrolyzed yeast extract" and MSG.

Mounting evidence:
1)MSG, a well-known flavor enhancer, is manufactured by utilizing sugar beet or cane molasses.
2) Red Star Nutritional Yeast is manufactured by utilizing sugar beet or cane molasses.
3) The parent company of Red Star Yeast, Le Saffre, is a world leader in the manufacturing of "flavor enhancers".
4)"Monosodium glutamate is made by mixing glutamate with salt and water", from an article on MSG by Rhonda Parkinson. (http://chinesefood.about.com/od/healthconcerns/p/MSG.htm)

So with out being any more direct N.Y. contains compounds that can convert easily into MSG. Which is possibly why people may have such a strong reaction to N.Y.

Check the symptoms:
Do you experience these after eating N.Y. or certain processed foods?
-Headache
-Dizzyness
-Chest pains

Here is a good book to check out if you are concerned about these issues.
Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills
Russell L. Blaylock
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0929173252/qid=1026685677/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/002-5683115-2912851


So, if you are concerned about getting quality B-vitamins, amino acids and other quality vitamins look elsewhere to REAL whole foods (funny...we always end up coming back to this fundamental). Such as raw oysters, raw eggs, raw milk products and raw organ meats, especially raw liver. (remember to source the highest quality)

Try this recipe to get some real SUPPER FOOD NUTRITION.

Raw Egg Nog
16 ounces Raw milk (organic, grass feed, try Organic Pastures)(those with lactose intolerance or trying this for the first time try making you own raw Kefir)
4 eggs (organic, pasture raised)
1 very ripe banana
1/2 tsp vanilla extract (alcohol free)
1/4 tsp clove, ground
1/2 tsp cinnamon, ground
1/4 tsp freshly grated nutmeg

Combine all ingredients in a blender and blend briefly until smooth. Grate a little nutmeg on top and serve for a protein rich breakfast or snack.

Blessings
Jay
Tell me what you eat, and I'll tell you what you will become!

Offline Sondra Barrett

  • Former Bauman College Faculty Member
  • *
  • Posts: 106
    • Sondra Barrett  Mystic Molecules
Re: Nutritional yeast plus raw eggs
« Reply #13 on: March 25, 2008, 07:00:54 PM »
I was a little surprised at all the information about msg being so bad for us yet you recommend an egg nog made with raw eggs.  Egg white contains a protein avidin which binds a very essential vitamin biotin, making it unavailable to our cells.  Raw eggs can also be a source of salmonella, probably worse for us the MSG.  And like the essence of E4H, whole foods, all foods in moderation. 

Glutamate is an essential ingredient of life, our cells require it to function.  When we discover that it or its relative MSG is in all the nutritional 'good foods' like whey protein, do we remove that from our diet, or just take it in, in moderation. 

Accompanying the NYTimes article on MSG, I think, was also an article debunking the MSG-Chinese Restaurant Syndrome (I'll look for the source).  Last week I met with the chef who was one of the AMerican 'discoverers' of MSG and umami; his conclusion was that it was likely the peanut oil that contributed to the reported MSG symptoms.

More on that later.
PhD, Biochemistry, University of Illinois Medical School
Post-doctoral fellow, Immunology-hematology UCSF
Teaching bodymind medicine since 1988.
Mentor:School Garden Network"cooking from the garden"
Teaching NE and NC at Bauman since 2007

Offline blujay

  • Alumni
  • ***
  • Posts: 331
    • Herb'n Culture.com
Re: Nutritional yeast
« Reply #14 on: March 26, 2008, 01:55:58 AM »
Thanks for considering my post, I always advocate people to do their own research and come to their own dietary considerations. And to never just take one persons/reports view on a particular subject.

As with almost every food, they all contain desirable and undesirable compounds that can interact with our equally complex biology. So I've come to the conclusion that a 'perfect diet' or 'pure diet' isn't possible in this world, but that we can do alot to ensure that our bodies are well equipt to handle all the various offending substances even ones found in healthy foods. So I whole heartedly agree with our theme of "whole foods in moderation" 

As for eating whole raw eggs compared to nutritional yeast for a source of biotin and other nutrients, I've found that the nutritional benefits out weight the potential dangers of eating raw eggs.

Here is some considerations:

Egg yolks:
-The Yolk contain all of the fat soluble vitamins, (Per egg yolk:A-IU 245, D-IU 18, E-.69mg and K-.1mcg). Egg yolks are one of the few foods naturally containing vitamin D.
-Has a balanced B-vitamin profile, all which are highly bio-available
-Yolks contain a healthy array of fats. The composition (by weight) of the most prevalent fatty acids in egg yolk is typically as follows:
Unsaturated fatty acids:
           Oleic acid 47 %
           Linoleic acid 16 %
           Palmitoleic acid 5 %
           Linolenic acid 2 %
Saturated fatty acids:
           Palmitic acid 23 %
           Stearic acid 4 %
           Myristic acid 1 %

-Egg yolk is a source of lecithin, an emulsifier of fat that improves fat digestion.
-It contains more than two-thirds of the recommended daily limit of 300mg of cholesterol. Consuming it raw ensures that you aren't getting oxidized forms of cholesterol or Lipid-peroxides.
-The yellow color is caused by lutein and zeaxanthin, which are yellow or orange carotenoids known as xanthophylls.
--Biotin content in a large egg yolk is about 25mcg (about 10% of our RDA)
-The main role of biotin in the body is to assist in the metabolism of carbohydrates and fats. Severe biotin deficiency results in impaired functioning of the immune system, as well as a scaly dermatitis that resembles seborrhea (a condition characterized by reddened, oily scales on the face and scalp).
-Almost all foods contain some amount of biotin
-To experience the effects of biotin deficiency from eatting raw egg whites, one would have to eat 6-20 egg whites daily for about 8-18 months. These effects can be reversed in 2-5 days with biotin supplements
-Intestinal bacteria can produce and assist in biotin and other vitamin production and assimilation

Egg whites:
-protein composition of egg whites   
    Ovalbumin 54% Nourishment; blocks digestive enzymes
    Ovotransferrin 12% Binds iron
    Ovomucoid 11% Blocks digestive enzymes
    Globulins 8% Plugs defects in membranes, shell
    Lysozyme 3.5% Enzyme that digests bacterial cell walls (antibacterial)
    Ovomucin 1.5% Thickens egg white; inhibits viruses
    Avidin .06% Binds vitamin (biotin)
    Others 10% Bind vitamins, block digestive enzymes...

-Avidin composes .06% of the total protein in an egg, which is about .2 mg per egg
-cooking a whole egg only neutralizes 33-71% of Avidin, the rest binds with the remaining biotin in the yolk (to completely neutralize this protein, one would have to completely denature the proteins, ie high heat long cook time)
-cooked egg whites are much easier to absorb by the body. About 95% of the protein is absorbed when cooked where as only about 65% is absorbed when eaten raw.
-Whipping egg whites also denatures the proteins
-Salmonella infections are usually present only in traditionally raised commercial hens. The contamination rate is .003% of all the conventionally produced eggs. If you are purchasing your eggs from healthy chickens this infection risk reduces dramatically. Remember, only sick chickens lay salmonella-contaminated eggs. If you are obtaining high quality, cage-free, organically fed, omega-3 enhanced chicken eggs risk virtually disappears.
-Raw egg whites are naturally anti-bacterial

So I'm still of the impression that raw eggs are highly nutritious and don't pose a significant health threat from infections or biotin deficiencies, if used judiciously in ones diet.

The effects of blending the whole egg, in my previous recipe, assists in the denaturing process of the proteins, which reduces their side effects and increases digestion. While the raw milk provides even more biotin and probiotics to assist in the proper assimilation of the proteins and nutrients. While the spices add additional anti-bacterial and anti-viral properties, ensuring against the likelyhood of infection from Salmonella. Additionally the banana contains Prebiotics which help to feed the "good" bacteria to further ensure that they thrive and the "bad" guys don't.
 
Glutamine is a valuable amino-acid, but if it comes in the processed form of a potential excito-toxcin (found in Nutritional Yeast and whey products as MSG), I would rather take my chances with a whole, fresh food that I know the source, quality and processing of. I wonder why we can't find organic Nutritional yeast or whey products? (which makes me question the source even more)

Am I just being to much of a hardliner E4H, whole foods fanatic? I'm ok with that.

With all this in mind, I'm confident that eating raw eggs is still a safe addition to ones diet, with a few caveats.

1)Buy the highest quality, free range, organic, fresh eggs you can find
2)Clean your eggs with vegetable wash and apple cider vinegar and warm water
3)Learn how to tell a fresh egg from an old egg
4)Cook or eat them in a variety of ways (there is only 110 different ways to cook an egg!) and see how you react to each.
5)To avoid all of the above concerns, yet still get the most nutritional value from your eggs, eat the yolk raw and lightly cook/poach the egg white and eat them both.
6)Include other lacto-fermented foods into your diet often to avoid infections and to boost your immune system.


Just eat it whole!
Jay

(1)On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen
by Harold McGee (78-118)
(2)http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/cgi-bin/list_nut_edit.pl
(3)http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2005/02/09/raw-eggs.aspx
(4)http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1365-2621.1991.tb05361.x?cookieSet=1&journalCode=jfds
(5)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egg_white#cite_note-AHA-4
(6)http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2002/11/13/eggs-part-two.aspx
Tell me what you eat, and I'll tell you what you will become!

 


anything