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Author Topic: Feeding a Family and Eating For Health On a Budget  (Read 150944 times)

Offline misswoo

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Re: Feeding a Family E4H On a Budget
« Reply #150 on: December 15, 2015, 11:24:28 AM »
This thread is extremely interesting to read. Not least since it takes our ideal world of desiring healthy nutrition for ourselves and our families and puts it into the practical reality of finances, choice, and the influence of mass marketing.

I live in the Austrian Alps in Europe. It has been a good ten years since since chain supermarkets have provided a wide range of organic products and seasonal, locally grown produce. These food stuffs can also be found at eye-level on the shelves - an indicator of persuading consumers to purchase easily, as opposed to hunting for, better quality and health-giving goods. I have also noted that price has rapidly changed, certainly if a supermarket chain picks up on a brand that carries diversified product range which can meet many demands, from oils to nut spreads, cereals to pasta, seeds to nuts. I spend 40% less on organic produce that five years ago and can even buy the new exotics like chia, goji and algae - normally the realm of the hardcore health food shop.

I can eat organic, fresh seasonal foods, including eggs, grass-fed butter, linseed/olive oil and enough food for my personal week on $40. I buy to eat: in other words, I don't do a 'just in case' impulse purchase, or buy something before it runs out. I make sure I use all my vegetables and fruit before buying a new batch - so might end up with a rather interesting and creative soup before I replenish!

I would say my cupboards and fridge have good feng shui with positive energy; psychologically I don't feel lack or have a poverty mentality. For me, it just seems to make sense to eat what I have - instead of overconsuming. Which is what we could all do, whether we are organic and conscious healthy eaters or not, whether money is an issue or not. Cupboards that are rammed with ingredients, however quality-based, might do the opposite to inspire meal choices. Foods that spoil quickly or get lost in the background past sell-by-dates might end up in the compost bin - an example of global food waste. In trying new products, that bulgar wheat might not be to your taste, so give the packet away to a friend. And, whilst I am mindful that this model might work for my budget as a single person, I still feel reverence to the bigger picture - to simplify and not waste; to respect the local farmer's hard work; and eat well. Which certainly helps in not over-spending too!




Offline Nori

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Re: Feeding a Family E4H On a Budget
« Reply #151 on: December 19, 2015, 01:43:54 PM »
Such a great philosophy-- to avoid waste, a very important standard in my family of origin.  Amazing to me is that some folks dislike leftovers and will toss anything not eaten.  Yet another approach is dumpster diving, something I learned about reading FARM CITY by Novella Carpenter, albeit for her voracious pigs. It's not all packaged foods that she found-- perfectly good produce that was being replaced by newer stock. A recent article on seafood waste was stunning-- 50% is tossed because it spoiled before being cooked or consumed.  Companies like IMPERFECT are doing their best to get people to change the way they purchase produce.  There is still so much more to do in this realm.


I enjoyed reading your post. 
Nori M. Hudson, BA, MS
Instructor, Bauman College, Berkeley
Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition by and Registered with NANP
Certified Diet Counselor, Nutrition Educator,  Nutrition Consultant, and Nutrition Teacher through Bauman College

Offline anasuya

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Re: Feeding a Family E4H On a Budget
« Reply #152 on: December 21, 2015, 09:56:40 AM »
I appreciate the idea of adding an awareness of feng shui to the pantry, ie. keeping it organized and easy to navigate. I am so in-need of a pantry re-org myself and it's on the top of my list to have done before I greet the new year.

Apparently left-over meats are higher in histamines and so some people who are sensitive to histamines react poorly to them. I wonder if the people I know who are turned off by left overs have this issue.

It is amazing to read how much food waste there is.

My sister keeps a board on her fridge which lists what veggies are inside so she is reminded to eat them before they go bad.

Offline Nori

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Re: Feeding a Family E4H On a Budget
« Reply #153 on: December 22, 2015, 07:52:17 AM »
I am very curious to know any correlations between aversion to leftovers and problems with high histamines.
[/size]
[/size]This year I did a talk on acne and eczema (Community Conversations) and the matter of high histamine foods was mentioned as a potential contributing factor to both conditions.  Foods that block the enzyme DAO (Diamine oxidase) that decommissions histamines can be blocked by eating certain foods:      [/size]Diamine Oxidase (DAO) blockers: alcohol, black, green and mate teas, energy drinks (which are also high in histamines).  Also some medications are high in histamine, which could have an additive effect: http://www.diagnosisdiet.com/histamine-intolerance/
[/size]And some people are born with low levels of DAO. Supplements that help some include vitamins C and B6, as well as adequate copper (the latter is usually not a problem). 


     
Nori M. Hudson, BA, MS
Instructor, Bauman College, Berkeley
Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition by and Registered with NANP
Certified Diet Counselor, Nutrition Educator,  Nutrition Consultant, and Nutrition Teacher through Bauman College

Offline neetam478

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Re: Feeding a Family E4H On a Budget
« Reply #154 on: September 09, 2016, 11:09:46 AM »
This forum is awesome.  I am a new student and trying to get my way around.

Offline Marlina E

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Re: Feeding a Family E4H On a Budget
« Reply #155 on: September 16, 2016, 04:52:28 PM »
Welcome! Glad you are liking the content. This post in particular has been popular for so long.  And there are tons more amazing shares and discussions in our forum. Glad you are here!
BA Environmental Studies UCSB
Nutrition Consultant

Offline travisrehard

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Re: Feeding a Family E4H On a Budget
« Reply #156 on: October 31, 2016, 06:12:51 PM »
This discussion was split from a previous topic, hence the way it sort of jumps into discussion below, but you will get the idea.... - M.E. Moderator

I spend between $120 - $200 per week on a family of 6 (that includes 2-80lb dogs that I homecook for).  We also eat only local, seasonal and organic (with a few exceptions).  That also includes plenty of organic meat (both for the humans and the four legged).  I enjoy seeing how other people shop for groceries.  Its been my hobby for the past 5+ years. ;D I am always irritated when I hear others say it costs too much to eat well.

I as well get very irritated when I hear that it cost too much to eat well.  Yes it can become pricey if all you buy is high end Organic foods from supermarkets. Purchasing cheap food is like buying cheap gasoline for your vehicle, yes it may get you where you need to be but why would you choose to continue to experience terrible fuel economy (low energy) at the expense of a few dollars.  Eating well does not break the piggy bank if you know how to shop and prepare foods properly.  Thumbs Up!

Offline kyliejohnson

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Re: Feeding a Family E4H On a Budget
« Reply #157 on: November 25, 2016, 09:02:34 PM »
This is a very inspiring post. For someone who cooks every meal at home (on too much of a restricted diet to trust eating out at restaurants) I find myself going to the grocery store a lot and spending a lot!! I usually shop at Whole Foods, New Leaf, or other small local health food stores, and avoid stores like Safeway. I always try to make enough dinner for leftovers, occasionally meal plan, and try to purchase mostly organic. I've never actually tracked how much I spend monthly on food, and to be honest, don't pay enough attention to price labels at the store...I buy what I need and just suck it up. However, this post has inspired me to keep track of next month’s grocery spending to see if there is room for better budgeting. I also like the idea of going to the store once a week for meats and plan meals based off your purchases. I find myself going to the store most often for veggies and protein, so it would be nice to minimize that by a little thoughtful planning.

I've always wondered does cooking your own meals and buying organic, whole foods actually save you money versus eating out and buying meals on the go?

Offline lisas872

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Re: Feeding a Family and Eating For Health On a Budget
« Reply #158 on: February 03, 2017, 07:55:45 AM »
That is amazing!  Inspirational.  I have a family of 4 humans (one is 4 months so she doesn't count for food yet) and a dog and I think I spend about $275 a week on food, plus we go out to dinner fairly often.  Would you be willing to share a typical food planning week with us?  You mentioned you food plan for the week on Sundays.  That is where I get stuck so often and away wind up throwing away food at the end of the week and it KILLS ME!

Offline lizetrojas

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Re: Feeding a Family and Eating For Health On a Budget
« Reply #159 on: March 01, 2017, 02:03:46 PM »
Wow this is very good information, thank you for that. I spend about the same as you an we are a family of two. Being new to trying to get everything organic or farmers market I think I need to do more planing. How difficult did you find it starting your own garden? That is something I want to start doing too.

Offline sdemaria

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Re: Feeding a Family and Eating For Health On a Budget
« Reply #160 on: March 25, 2017, 11:30:02 AM »
What a great topic and wonderful insights in this forum.
I have been passionate about cooking on a budget since i was a raw vegan college student and my choices of what to buy and where, were very limited.  As a mindful parent now I believe in both providing and teaching our children with the best possible resources we can get and sometimes that comes with a higher price.  Nonetheless is well worth it and with a little planning and conscientious decisions we  have been able to stick to our budget.  I wanted to share what has worked for me.
1. I try to have a monthly budget as opposed to a weekly budget. This gives me more freedom to play around with my choices and to not have to stress about each purchase. It is also a great treat when i have a little bit extra $ at the end of the month and get to   splurge on something i normally wouldn't buy.
2. I actually do not shop at large retailers. I became member of our local coop and get a discount some people find it cheaper to buy on sale products and organic items from large retailers but if you look closer most of this products come from abroad, have a lot of packaging and that is some of the ideas i am trying to avoid all together,
3. I buy bulk for all of my staples. Both bulk bins and case purchases are my friends. This is one of the reasons a monthly budget is better for me too. most stores give you a 5% to 10% discount to buy bulk ( and bring your own container) and buy unbroken cases. Some of the items I get are. Local olive oil,  rice, oats, dry beans, granola, almonds , almond milk, quinoa, whole wheat pasta, almond butter,  nuts, sea salt, apple cider vinegar, castile soap, rice flour, coconut oil, herbal teas, all spices, miso paste, coffee. Some of this stuff last for more than a month.
4. I usually buy my produce and meats or fish at the farmers market. Most of the seasonal produce at a very reasonable price so we get creative  and eat mostly in season. ( in the winter when there is not a lot of variety we buy some organic frozen staples or some farmers can their surplus and they are delighted to share the love with you. )  I am a vegetarian but my children and husband are not so I buy a large piece of meat and clean it and portion it at home. same with the chicken and make chicken broth.  We also utilize EVERY part of the veggies  and meat and try to minimize waste.
5. Cheese, eggs an dairy. We have 5 chickens at home so we get eggs from them. We get our milk at the farmers market in a returnable container so  the price comes down a lot and there is no waste. cheeses and butter i buy at the local coop and usually buy it bulk.

I hope this inspires people to explore their local options instead of always going to Whole Foods, nothing wrong with that but it is so incredible to get to know your local farmers and share the passion they feel for what they do. It connect us. It humanized what we eat and heals the soul.

Offline Nori

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Re: Feeding a Family and Eating For Health On a Budget
« Reply #161 on: March 25, 2017, 03:48:42 PM »
Wow!  This is what people did before WW2-- family farms and self-sufficiency.  Do you also grow vegetables in season?
Nori M. Hudson, BA, MS
Instructor, Bauman College, Berkeley
Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition by and Registered with NANP
Certified Diet Counselor, Nutrition Educator,  Nutrition Consultant, and Nutrition Teacher through Bauman College

Offline sdemaria

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Re: Feeding a Family and Eating For Health On a Budget
« Reply #162 on: March 25, 2017, 08:13:28 PM »
Nori, it is work but it is well worth it.
We try to grow our own vegetables. however we are very close to the bay and we do not get a lot of sun or warm weather so we grow potatoes, hearty greens and a lot of lettuces.  I also have a living wall inside with herbs!
Children really benefit from seeing and experiencing this process.  We also buy a lo of whole grains and process them ourselves. My older son loves to help me roll the oats and mill the corn.

Offline mouali

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Re: Feeding a Family and Eating For Health On a Budget
« Reply #163 on: March 30, 2017, 10:04:58 AM »
This topic is very important for any family trying to switch to real food on a budget. We are a family of four ( single mother with three children ) I spend so much in grocery shopping a month and reading all of you guys experiences has inspired me to take a close look and at what I can do to still eat fresh local foods at an affordable price. Tank you for sharing!

Massiva

Offline nlea

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Re: Feeding a Family and Eating For Health On a Budget
« Reply #164 on: April 10, 2017, 04:40:17 PM »
Hi -

This post has inspired me to start tracking the amount of money I spend on groceries/food. I have never thought much about budgeting when it comes to food, I don't want to sacrifice what I want to eat because of cost.

Now, since joining Bauman, I really want to focus on buying only local and organic, which will definitely increase my costs. Before, I tried to buy organic but probably only did 30% of the time. I have started going to the farmers market, and we use Imperfect Produce 2x a month (a local CSA that is discounted because the produce is "imperfect" and would otherwise be going to waste), but I'm looking for other ideas so that I don't have to sacrifice quality if this becomes expensive.

Any other ideas besides farmers markets and CSA boxes? I live with my boyfriend so there are just two of us to cook for.

Appreciate any insight!

Thanks,
Nicolette

 


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