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Author Topic: Confusing contradictions in my studies  (Read 3595 times)

Offline GayH

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Confusing contradictions in my studies
« on: March 11, 2008, 12:52:06 PM »
I'm in the first bit of the NE distance learning program and I have come across several seemingly contradictory pieces of information and I was hoping someone can clarify things for me.

1.  In the lecture CD, Dr. Bauman discusses all of the fad diets, one of which is Atkins.  He points out that it is, of course, lacking in vital vitamins and minerals and is not the best way to eat.  However, The Atkins Diet book is on the list of recommended reading.  Why is that?

2.  I just read chapters 3, 4, and 5 of Know Your Fats.  Dr. Enig tells us all about the virtues of properly produced animal fats, both butter and meat.  But now I'm reading The Encyclopedia of Healing Foods and it says to "avoid entirely" butter, ham, bacon and other smoked and cured meats.  It gives no mention of healthful versions of these products.  However a paragraph before it states the Mediterranean diet as one of the  "most healthful diets ever studied."  To my knowledge, those who eat the traditional mediterranean diet consume cured meats, butter, and smoked meats.   

3.  I still can't figure out if canola oil is healthy or not.  Dr. Enig does not explicitly say it's bad, but she does say it's bad for growing children and is not allowed in infant formula.  The Encyclopedia of Healing Foods says to use it instead of butter and in baked goods. 

I would love to understand these issues further.
Thanks!

Offline ValerieM

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Re: Confusing contradictions in my studies
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2008, 03:02:48 PM »
I think that everyone here has had the same feelings that you have right now...but the truth is that there is no one truth, we as individuals have different reactions to different things, so there is no end-all-be-all answer to everything. Trial and error is the best way to find out your own truths...some things will work amazingly for one and not at all for another, that is the beauty of being biologically different....we all have our own truths!!

I am currerently doing the Bauman/HCHS marticulation module and I am finding a lot of things that I don't line up with in the text, but talking with Fern Leaf made me feel better, she explained how we find our own solutions sometimes by looking at the full spectum of things...hope this helps to know you are not alone in these thoughts you have!! Good luck!

Offline Ed Bauman

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Re: Confusing contradictions in my studies
« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2008, 04:28:19 PM »
Gay and Valerie: Thanks for your questions and comments. I will respond to the initial items one at a time below in italics.

1.  In the lecture CD, Dr. Bauman discusses all of the fad diets, one of which is Atkins.  He points out that it is, of course, lacking in vital vitamins and minerals and is not the best way to eat.  However, The Atkins Diet book is on the list of recommended reading.  Why is that?

I want students to be aware of the information that is presented by a wide range of nutritional authors and so-called experts. I respect Dr. Atkins, though I don't agree with him. He fails to discuss food quality safety, e.g. chemicals and hormones in food, which has become a real danger, even more so than eating meat and veggies. A junk food Atkins is a fad diet and can kill someone. A healthfood Atkins, could be useful for a short time, but not as a maintenance diet.

2.  I just read chapters 3, 4, and 5 of Know Your Fats.  Dr. Enig tells us all about the virtues of properly produced animal fats, both butter and meat.  But now I'm reading The Encyclopedia of Healing Foods and it says to "avoid entirely" butter, ham, bacon and other smoked and cured meats.  It gives no mention of healthful versions of these products. 

I don't know why Murray puts butter in the same category as smoked and cured pork and lunch meat. He may be suggesting that commercial butter carries fat soluble toxins... but in a grass fed, organic cow, this would not be a major problem. OK, most folks reading his book are eating commercial butter, which could pose health problems if the diet was poor and health compromised.


However a paragraph before it states the Mediterranean diet as one of the  "most healthful diets ever studied."  To my knowledge, those who eat the traditional mediterranean diet consume cured meats, butter, and smoked meats.   

What folks eat in a traditional Mediterranean diet and issues with cured meats would depend on the quality of the meats, the way the meats were cured, and most importantly what else they eat, be it fresh veggies, fruits, olives and olive oil, fish and garlic. The total diet has to be in place for it to be healthy, not just the meats and dairy, which is often goat or sheep in a Mediterranean diet.

3.  I still can't figure out if canola oil is healthy or not.  Dr. Enig does not explicitly say it's bad, but she does say it's bad for growing children and is not allowed in infant formula.  The Encyclopedia of Healing Foods says to use it instead of butter and in baked goods.

There are folks who believe canola oil is horrible. When I spoke with Spectrum Naturals, a local organic oil producer, they assured me that they use organic rape seeds, extract out the harmful phytotoxins, don't use GMO canola (which is assumed by Enig and others) and that it has been carefully tested for immune reactivity. I wouldn't suggest anyone buy commercial canola oil, or use even organic canola oil excessively or cook it at high heat, which is bad for lipids, even butter and coconut oil... but I am not going to categorically damn it.

E4H is about careful consideration of source, quality, moderate use, variety of other sources and individual sampling/testing to come to a personal conclusion... more than relying on anyone who has a bias (which is common in our field) for one thing and against market competitor.

« Last Edit: March 14, 2008, 04:28:01 PM by Marlina E »
President, Bauman College
Clinical Director, Bauman Nutrition Clinic
Facilitator, Vitality Fasting Retreats
Ph.D. in Health Promotion, U of New Mexico
M.Ed. in Education, U of Massachusetts
President, Board of Directors, NANP
Faculty, JFKU,New College

Offline GayH

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Re: Confusing contradictions in my studies
« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2008, 01:29:20 PM »
Thanks so much for the clarifications!  All of this information can sometimes make your head spin and knowing that it is all written in different contexts seems to be the key.

Offline MargieS

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Re: Confusing contradictions in my studies
« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2008, 03:47:53 AM »
I, too, have felt overwhelmed and confused by all of the information I have read and listened to in the CD's. One says one thing and the other says another. It has been a very frustrating journey because I want to believe what I read, and there is always something to contradict it. I agree with Valerie, in that we all have to find what works. And that takes time and knowledge.

My mentor Susan has been so helpful with putting things in perspective and reminding me that changing my 45 year old lifestyle habits, means taking the rest of my life to do it in. And it means reading and staying up on the most current information and research available. I love this program and without even trying, I have made significant changes in my diet. I find I crave vegetables more, when eating vegetables were almost painful for me my entire life. My stomach churns at the thought of fast food, when that was a staple in my diet due to my fast paced lifestyle. I wont drink tap water, and I am off all over the counter medications that used to be an every day thoughtless act.  I threw out my microwave oven and for some reason, I completely lost the taste for my morning coffee. If someone had told me I would give up coffee even last year, I would have laughed in their face. I just don't want it.  I wake up to peppermint tea, as Dr. Bauman had suggested in one of his earlier CD's.

I can't say enough about this program. It is healing my life, and I am anxious to be able to put it to work to help others in my Private Practice.

Thank you Bauman Staff and for You Ed!

Margie S from New York
« Last Edit: March 16, 2008, 04:12:36 AM by MargieS »

Offline BrookeW

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Re: Confusing contradictions in my studies
« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2008, 09:34:16 PM »
Dear Margie S.
I just had to reply to your post, as it sounds like you and I are on the same path!  In NE 101, out went the microwave;  goodbye to the coffee (I never planned to give up coffee....I, too, simply lost my taste for it!!!);  and though I was eating pretty well (I've been working with a Bauman-trained NC for several years and she helped me learn about healthy eating), I've made MANY changes in my diet already, too, thanks to my studies.....I've just started NE 102....I can't wait to see what other changes happen!

I feel great!  It's so wonderful.  I, too, love studying this stuff, and applying directly to my life.

Let's keep it up!
Brooke, in CA
Brooke

Offline MargieS

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Re: Confusing contradictions in my studies
« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2008, 03:33:09 PM »
Brooke, thanks! I sometimes feel like I am so out of my element trying to learn this. It's like learning a foreign language. That is so funny about the coffee. Why, i wonder. I would have never given up coffee, and i just dont have the taste for it. Inch by Inch. Good luck, and it's nice to have Sisters in Spirit on the path to health and wellbeing!

margie In New York

 


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