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Author Topic: Healthy Russian Recipes  (Read 4156 times)

Offline RoseannR

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Healthy Russian Recipes
« on: July 25, 2008, 11:27:39 PM »
I am working with a Russian client with multiple health issues: obesity, had thyroid removed last year due to cancer, high blood pressure, kidney stones & acid reflux, etc.

I am working on meals and recipes for her, but would like to include healthy meals from her Russian culture. 

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated,

Thanks - Roseann

AbbyB

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Re: Healthy Russian Recipes
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2008, 12:02:51 AM »
Kasha (toasted buckwheat) is extremely healthy and is an essential part of the traditional Russian diet. There are quite a few ways to prepare kasha - both sweet and savory. I like it with butter and salt. Buckwheat is very high in protein and is gluten-free to boot.

Another traditional Russian favorite is beet borscht - full of vitamins and antioxidants. You can find lots of recipes for it on the web.

Dark rye bread, potato pancakes, even sour cream (if it's organic and eaten in small amounts) - lots of good stuff in the Russian diet!

Offline blujay

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Re: Healthy Russian Recipes
« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2008, 03:46:01 AM »
Russia has been the source of some amazing healthy food products and traditions. It would be appropriate to help your client regain the appreciation and taste of some of her home countries' foods.

One of the best foods from their country, and simplest, is sauerkraut. This is the real Russian "Culture". Learn to make it and teach it to your client, it has the potential to help regain her health.

Try this combo:
(makes about 1 qt)
1 med head Purple cabbage
1/2 lb carrots
1 lg red beet

1/4 bunch parsley (rough chopped)
Juice of 1 lemon
2" square piece of whole lemon peel (minced)
1 T dill (dried)
1 T black pepper (ground)
1 t caraway seeds (whole)
2 T sea salt

Shred the vegetables and massage with the remaining ingredients, press into a glass jar with a loose fitting lid and allow to culture for at least 1 week. Enjoy as a condiment after every meal.

Also make a really rich bone and vegetable broth for a base of a borsht soup, she will love you forever! Remember to use lots of sea vegetables in the broth.

Load up on lots of greens, making sure to lightly steam them to avoid the goitrigenic effect.

Help her to ween off of wheat and pasturized dairy products, which is usually a mainstay in Russian cuisine.

Get her interested in the food process, and have her share some of her favorite recipes, then make them into a healthier version.

Blessings and health,
Jay
Tell me what you eat, and I'll tell you what you will become!

Offline RoseannR

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Re: Healthy Russian Recipes
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2008, 09:38:46 PM »
Kasha (toasted buckwheat) is extremely healthy and is an essential part of the traditional Russian diet. There are quite a few ways to prepare kasha - both sweet and savory. I like it with butter and salt. Buckwheat is very high in protein and is gluten-free to boot.

Another traditional Russian favorite is beet borscht - full of vitamins and antioxidants. You can find lots of recipes for it on the web.

Dark rye bread, potato pancakes, even sour cream (if it's organic and eaten in small amounts) - lots of good stuff in the Russian diet!
Great idea - thanks!

Offline RoseannR

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Re: Healthy Russian Recipes
« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2008, 09:39:58 PM »
Russia has been the source of some amazing healthy food products and traditions. It would be appropriate to help your client regain the appreciation and taste of some of her home countries' foods.

One of the best foods from their country, and simplest, is sauerkraut. This is the real Russian "Culture". Learn to make it and teach it to your client, it has the potential to help regain her health.

Try this combo:
(makes about 1 qt)
1 med head Purple cabbage
1/2 lb carrots
1 lg red beet

1/4 bunch parsley (rough chopped)
Juice of 1 lemon
2" square piece of whole lemon peel (minced)
1 T dill (dried)
1 T black pepper (ground)
1 t caraway seeds (whole)
2 T sea salt

Shred the vegetables and massage with the remaining ingredients, press into a glass jar with a loose fitting lid and allow to culture for at least 1 week. Enjoy as a condiment after every meal.

Also make a really rich bone and vegetable broth for a base of a borsht soup, she will love you forever! Remember to use lots of sea vegetables in the broth.

Load up on lots of greens, making sure to lightly steam them to avoid the goitrigenic effect.

Help her to ween off of wheat and pasturized dairy products, which is usually a mainstay in Russian cuisine.

Get her interested in the food process, and have her share some of her favorite recipes, then make them into a healthier version.

Blessings and health,
Jay
Thank you so much for the ideas & recipes!

Offline jodi f.

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Re: Healthy Russian Recipes
« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2008, 06:45:54 AM »
Hi Roseann,

Here's a more clinical take on all this. I think she needs a good holistic doc to take a look at how well her thyroid's being managed. Thyroid cancer occurs often in people who have been hypothyroid, and, of course, they're officially hypothyroid anyway as soon as the gland's removed. Most thyroidectomy clients I meet with are on Synthroid only. This often doesn't resolve hypothyroid symptoms, which include obesity, high blood pressure and indigestion/acid reflux. She should also have her vitamin D levels checked. I imagine that most of her conditions are linked somehow. In other words, I'm sure you're doing a great job, but she's got a constellation of symptoms here that would likely benefit from clinical help. Maybe refer her to the Bauman Nutrition clinic--something to help her get an opinion other than straight medical, especially where the thyroid stuff is concerned.

The bread and grain ideas all sound great, but I'd keep the amounts eaten very small. Acid reflux generally responds very well to small meals of protein and vegetables. Large meals and carbohydrates tend to exacerbate it. She needs good carbohydrates, of course, but her body may be happier on very small amounts--about 1/2 cup per meal. This is not to say you want to overdo protein. You don't want to overdo anything. In fact, calorie restriction would most likely do a lot of good for her. There are some specific percentages of how much food to cut out, but I like to tell clients to eat slowly, chew well, and leave the table before they get full. This helps reflux, weight, and overall health. Blujay's food ideas all sound great. They're from the Nourishing Traditions concept of back-to-the-future eating and are, indeed, healthful. Hopefully she has the energy to devote to some of these recipes.

As for the kidney stones, there's some good info on the web. Are they calcium stones (the most common) or uric acid? Generally these respond well to vitamin C- and magnesium-rich foods (greens and seeds), though a complete range of nutrients, as always, is vital to her health. (How's her digestion, BTW?).  How 'bout a nice beet borscht Vital smoothie? Kidding, sort of. But really, sneak those good booster foods in any way you can, especially if she's low on the energy and/or motivation necessary to undertake complicated recipes.

Offline Stella

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Re: Healthy Russian Recipes
« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2008, 11:14:48 PM »
Hi Roseann,

Hope this recipes will help you and your client:
1. KVAS Can be used as a refreshing drink or as a base for cold soups
   To make KVAS you will need:

   1 gallon + 1/2 cup filtered water
   6 slices of dark rye bread (bread with no additives or preservatives)
   1/2 cup + 1 tsp. sugar
   1/4 tsp.dry active east
First, you need to make sourdough. Dry rye bread slices in oven until very dark but not burned. Make crumbs out of 1 slice of dried bread (reserve rest 5 slices for later), mix it with 1/4 tsp. dry east, 1 tsp. sugar and about 1/2 cup warm water. Cover and let seat for at least 10 hours (better to leave for 24 hours).This is your sourdough. To make KVAS you will need to mix 1 gallon of warm water with remaining bread slices, 1/2 cup sugar and the sourdough. Leave for about 10-12 hours. When kvas starts to foam, strain it through cheesecloth and refrigerate. Can be stored up to 1 week.
2. LIVER PATE  Liver contains plentiful trace elements, minerals and B-group vitamins.
   To make LIVER PATE you will need:

   1lb fresh organic chicken liver
   olive oil
   2 small onions (one chopped, one whole)
   2 garlic cloves
   bay leaf
   whole black pepper (peppercorns)
   salt
   2 hard boiled eggs(optional)
   water
Rinse liver under cold water, boil it for about 20 min. with whole onion, 2 garlic cloves, bay leaf and 3-4 peppercorns. In separate pan simmer chopped onion in olive oil until golden brown. Once liver is cooked drain it and then blend liver, golden-brown onions and eggs in the blender. Season to taste.
3. EGGPLANT CAVIAR  Good source of potassium and manganese, easy to prepare, taste delicious hot and cold.
   To make EGGPLANT CAVIAR you will need:

   3 small eggplants
   2 large onions finely chopped
   olive oil
   1 green bell pepper diced
   3-4 tomatoes, peeled, diced
   salt, black pepper to taste
   1 tbsp.honey
Bake eggplants at 375F for about 45-55 min.(pierce with fork before baking)
Meanwhile cook onion in olive oil, gradually adding green bell peppers then tomatoes.
Peel baked eggplants, dice and add to the onion mix. Season to taste and simmer covered at low heat for about 40 min. Add honey and simmer for another 5-10 min.


 


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