Bauman College Programs

Author Topic: new york state licensing?  (Read 16684 times)

Offline MeridaRose

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1
new york state licensing?
« on: January 15, 2009, 08:41:46 AM »
Hello

I live in New York and am considering attending the Nutrition Educator program through
the distance learning option.  Is there a website I can go to which will tell me what the laws are in each state regarding the practice of nutrition?

Also, I'm interested in finding other people in the New York City area who are interested in the NE distance learning option.  It would be nice to get a study group together, or an informal class.  I'm excited about earning these credentials from Bauman, but nervous about going it alone and missing out on classroom discussion and debate. 

Thanks so much!
Merida  :)

Offline Marsha McLaughlin

  • Admissions
  • Staff
  • *****
  • Posts: 169
Re: new york state licensing?
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2009, 12:57:03 PM »
Hi Merida

I have included below a website that will give you the information you are looking for on State Licensure Laws.  I have also attached to this post the newest State Professional Regulation Sheet.  Both of these sources contain good information.

http://lifestylemanagement.com/index.htm
On the left hand side of the page click on Continuing Education Courses and then on Licensure Laws. 

State regulations fall into three categories of dietetic approval, and are included on both of the above sources.  They are 1) licensure, 2) certification, and 3) registered.

Licensure is the most restrictive category. Statutes include an explicitly defined scope of practice and performance of the profession is illegal without first obtaining a license from the state.  You need to research and respect this requirement if you live in one of these states.

I am available to speak with you in more detail on the above, or answer any additional questions that you may have.  You can reach me by phone at 800-987-7530 or by email at admissions@baumancolleg.org

On another note, this forum provides a great opportunity to connect with other Distance Learning students in the New York city area and beyond.

Be Well,

Marsha McLaughlin
Admissions Supervisor
admissions@baumancollege.org





Offline Alabama

  • Alumni
  • ***
  • Posts: 125
  • Eat Well Be Well
State licensure information
« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2009, 12:34:27 PM »
I was just tooling around on the forum and found this thread.  The link is really informative and crucial to all of us as we embark on careers in a not so holistic world

http://lifestylemanagement.com/index.htm

check it out!
DeeAnnna Wales-VanReken
Certified Natural Chef
Bastyr MSN/DPD candidate 2013

Offline KristinC

  • Alumni
  • ***
  • Posts: 130
Re: new york state licensing?
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2009, 02:29:44 PM »
Okay, just to be clear, since I find these sites really confusing...in any of the states (and there are a lot) that have licensing laws regarding "dietetics", no one can practice nutritional counseling (what we do) in any form unless you are a registered dietitian in that state--do I have that right?

That certainly limits us quite a bit...well, geographically anyway. Thanksfully, I don't currently live in one of those states!

Offline KristinC

  • Alumni
  • ***
  • Posts: 130
Re: new york state licensing?
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2009, 02:32:04 PM »
I just thought about it and that even rules out people who are certified clinical nutritionists (CCN), with advanced degrees from accredited universities!  What a shame that it restricts the nutritional perspective like that. :(

Offline Alabama

  • Alumni
  • ***
  • Posts: 125
  • Eat Well Be Well
Re: new york state licensing?
« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2009, 05:18:31 PM »
From what I can gather, the answer to that would be yes when it comes to states that require licensure.  It seems like in those states one would have to be constantly supervised and under the direction of a registered dietician.  The good (and bad) news is, some states have no regulations and that many states will allow us to practice as long as we do not refer to ourselves as Dietitians.  I was glad to find that I will be able to practice in Oregon. However, I am originally from North Carolina and it would mean big trouble practicing there if I were caught.  It discourages me greatly that there cannot be more legislation protecting natural health care providers in EVERY state.  I hope that the NANP can really promote this Holistic Nutrition Board Exam so that the standards are respected more fully.
DeeAnnna Wales-VanReken
Certified Natural Chef
Bastyr MSN/DPD candidate 2013

Offline Marsha McLaughlin

  • Admissions
  • Staff
  • *****
  • Posts: 169
Re: new york state licensing?
« Reply #6 on: April 01, 2009, 02:27:33 PM »
Hello

The State Professional Regulations can cause some confusion. To simplify and help you understand the state licensing requirements, I have provided some additional information below.

There are only three State Professional Regulation categories and a state will fall into one:

1) Licensing-statutes include an explicitly defined scope of practice, and performance of the profession is illegal with first obtaining a license from the state

2) Certification-limits use of particular titles to persons meeting predetermined requirements, while persons not certified can still practice the occupation or profession

3) Registration
-is the least restrictive form of state regulation. As with certification, unregistered persons are permitted to practice the profession.  Typically, exams are not given and enforcement of the registration requirement is minimal

We need to be concerned with category one:
1) Licensing: Licensing is the most restrictive category. Statutes include an explicitly defined scope of practice and performance of the profession is illegal without first obtaining a license from the state.  You need to research and respect this requirement if you live in one of these states.

Should a Bauman College graduate want to apply their Nutrition Education skills in a state with a nutrition licensing requirement, the Nutrition Educator or Nutrition Consultant should work as an employee of a licensed health care practitioner as a Natural Health Educator or Counselor who uses the Bauman College Holistic Nutrition approach.  Employers of our graduates in these states recognize that the value of holistic nutrition goes beyond the standard American Dietetic Association approved curriculum taught in mainstream nutrition courses.  Private practice as a Nutrition Educator or Nutrition Consultant is not legally safe, sound or protected in these category 1 license required states.

The good news is that there are numerous states where there is no conflict of interest, title or training for our Nutrition Educator and Nutrition Consultant gradates. Dietitians need to be certified or registered, but others who are not certified may practice in these two categories:

Category 2: dietetic or nutritionist certification required or
Category 3: dietetic or nutritionist registration required states.

Dr. Ed Bauman, Director of Bauman College, makes the following statement:
“It is wise to be cautious in giving nutritional advice in a state that has a licensing requirement for Dietitians or Nutritionists.  I advise graduates to provide in their brochure and client information a full disclosure of training and experience.  There is no restriction on using “Health Counselor” as a term to describe one’s services.  Offering advice on sensible nutrition is a part of providing health education and support. A Nutrition Educator or Nutrition Consultant is advised to state that s/he is not a medical doctor, a registered dietitian, or licensed nutritionist. They are instructed to spell out what they offer to clients, which is the Bauman College Eating for Health system that suggests organic, seasonal, nutrient-rich, individualized food choices.  Bauman College graduates are teaching persons, of all ages and stages of health, lifestyle and self-care rather than MEDICAL NUTRITION.”

I hope I was able to provide some insight on the issues around State Professional Regulations. Be sure to contact me directly if you need additional clarification on this or any other issue.  I am always available by phone or email.

Be Well,
Marsha McLaughlin
Admissions Supervisor
admissions@baumancollege.org
800-987-7530

« Last Edit: April 03, 2009, 04:36:44 PM by Marsha McLaughlin »

Offline KristinC

  • Alumni
  • ***
  • Posts: 130
Re: new york state licensing?
« Reply #7 on: April 01, 2009, 02:55:20 PM »
Thanks for all the info--that's great.

Just to further confuse myself for a moment...I noticed that Liz Lipski practices in North Carolina.  Now, she is also not a RD, though she is a CCN.  Does that designation make it possible for her to practice as a clinical nutritionist?  You'd think it would!

Just trying to understand the field...

Also, I currently live in WI (where there is no licensure law), but hate the cold.  I am shopping for a slightly warmer state that would allow for a holistic practice, once I have finished my training. :)

Offline Marsha McLaughlin

  • Admissions
  • Staff
  • *****
  • Posts: 169
Re: new york state licensing?
« Reply #8 on: April 03, 2009, 10:38:49 AM »
Hello
My recommendation would be to research the State Professional Regulations directly with the state of North Carolina.  They would be able to give you the information you are looking for and explain exactly who is eligible for Licensing in the field of nutrition in North Carolina. Good luck and please report your findings back to the forum.  I would be very interested in the information you receive.

Be Well,

Marsha McLaughlin
Bauman College
Admissions Supervisor
800-987-7530
admissions@baumancollege.org

Offline Marlina E

  • Associate Director
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 1812
    • Bauman College Online
Re: new york state licensing?
« Reply #9 on: April 20, 2009, 04:08:00 PM »
The state of New Mexico has recently passed Health Freedom legislation that makes it LEGAL for Complementary and Alternative Healthcare Practitioners to perform "healing practices utilizing food, dietary supplements, nutrients and the physical forces of heat, cold, water, touch and light; ..."

Like similar legislation in Minnesota, California, Rhode Island, Idaho, Louisiana and Okalahoma, New Mexico now protects a variety of independent healthcare practitioners from charges of practicing medicine without a license.

You can read the full legislation here:  http://salsa.democracyinaction.org/dia/track.jsp?v=2&c=RqHs4ZdmHgAY8NgfadAEI%2BeQZHwbCgEy

BA Environmental Studies UCSB
Nutrition Consultant

Offline KristinC

  • Alumni
  • ***
  • Posts: 130
Re: new york state licensing?
« Reply #10 on: April 20, 2009, 07:25:54 PM »
Does this inlcude holistic nutrition consultants?  I looked over some of this, but I must admit I am pretty dense where legal documents are concerned.  It looked like it was addressing and highlighting naturopaths mostly...just wondering if anyone else has looked over this and has thoughts...

I am shopping for a new state to call home...an affordable place to live that will also be friendly to holistic nutrition/nonRDs!

Offline Marlina E

  • Associate Director
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 1812
    • Bauman College Online
Re: new york state licensing?
« Reply #11 on: April 21, 2009, 10:15:25 AM »
By the definition of the bill, a "complementary and alternative health care practitioner" means an individual who provides complementary and alternative health care services.  It is not limited to naturopaths.
BA Environmental Studies UCSB
Nutrition Consultant

Offline JuliaR

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 8
Re: new york state licensing?
« Reply #12 on: July 19, 2009, 03:51:12 PM »
This is all extremely helpful!!!  I am considering moving back to one of the countries highest obesity rated states, South Carolina, and it's good to know what I can practice.  I am eager to continue looking into SC specific language about this regulation, and I will keep you all posted.

Julia

Offline AndrienneY

  • Alumni
  • ***
  • Posts: 48
    • adrienneats
Re: new york state licensing?
« Reply #13 on: July 25, 2009, 10:27:46 AM »
I recently started the DL Nutrition Educator program from North Carolina. What are my options, since the state doesn't allow me to practice (without being supervised by a clinical dietician)? If I were to complete the Nutrition Consultant program and take the board, would I then be able to practice in the state of North Carolina? 

North Carolina specific licensing info: http://www.ncbdn.org/how_to_become_licensed.htm

Thanks! Just trying to see what my options are!
blog: adrienneats.blogspot.com
twitter: twitter.com/adrienneats
design: cargocollective.com/adrienneyancey
flickr: flickr.com/photos/anytype

Offline Marsha McLaughlin

  • Admissions
  • Staff
  • *****
  • Posts: 169
Re: new york state licensing?
« Reply #14 on: August 13, 2009, 04:42:26 PM »
Hello

You would not be able to use the term 'Nutrition' in your title in the State of North Carolina. You would be able to use such terms as 'Health Counselor' or 'Wellness Counselor'.  I commend you for checking with the State of North Carolina to learn what their specific licensing requirements are.  Licensing requirements vary from state to state.  

I recently spoke with someone from Rhode Island.  The state of Rhode Island also has a licensing requirement.  Upon contacting the appropriate agency in her state she learned that she was able to use the term "Nutrition" in her title as long as she did not say she was 'Registered'.

Please read my post in this thread, dated April 1, 2009, for more information on this topic.

Dr. Ed Bauman, Director of Bauman College, makes the following statement:
“It is wise to be cautious in giving nutritional advice in a state that has a licensing requirement for Dietitians or Nutritionists.  I advise graduates to provide in their brochure and client information a full disclosure of training and experience.  There is no restriction on using “Health Counselor” as a term to describe one’s services.  Offering advice on sensible nutrition is a part of providing health education and support. A Nutrition Educator or Nutrition Consultant is advised to state that s/he is not a medical doctor, a registered dietitian, or licensed nutritionist. They are instructed to spell out what they offer to clients, which is the Bauman College Eating for Health system that suggests organic, seasonal, nutrient-rich, individualized food choices.  Bauman College graduates are teaching persons, of all ages and stages of health, lifestyle and self-care rather than MEDICAL NUTRITION.”

Be sure to contact me if you would like to discuss personally.
Be Well,
Marsha McLaughlin
Admissions Supervisor
800-987-7530
admissions@baumancollege.org
« Last Edit: August 13, 2009, 04:45:51 PM by Marsha McLaughlin »