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Author Topic: Whole Foods Market debate  (Read 7238 times)

Offline LucyKateR

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Whole Foods Market debate
« on: December 13, 2007, 07:50:47 PM »
This is an interesting look at Whole Foods Markets and Walmart's new "organic" line of foods. Check it out, it's from Slate Magazine.

http://www.slate.com/id/2138176/

-Lucy

KellyT

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Re: Whole Foods Market debate
« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2007, 08:11:25 PM »
Interesting! Food for thought, as they would say.  :)

Thank you for sharing this.


Offline BrendaH

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Re: Whole Foods Market debate
« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2007, 04:32:37 PM »
I prefer to buy locally grown organics and it's surprising at the amount of organic produce that comes from outside the US.

Offline Stan

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Re: Whole Foods Market debate
« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2007, 08:46:24 PM »
I would much rather buy organic, but when the inorganic looks so much bigger and
healthier than organic, its really a tough decision.  Has anyone else had this experience?

Offline AmandaL

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Re: Whole Foods Market debate
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2007, 08:57:37 PM »
Stan-I was just watching something on fertilizer and how chemical fertilizer makes plants look very good (or healthy) but really lacks basic minerals.
Wife, mother, food lover, advocate
www.mydailydiner.com
Healthy Eating Specialist
Whole Foods Market, Arlington, VA

Offline blujay

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Re: Whole Foods Market debate
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2008, 08:45:43 PM »
When you are tempted to buy that larger and prettier product that is conventionally grown consider it this way.

Organic food has proven to be significantly higher in nutrition (7 year British study, http://green.msn.com/articles/article.aspx?aid=295&GT1=10725). They are so much higher that if you were to follow the RDA food pyramid and eat 5 servings of fruit and veggies per day you could eat only 4 servings of organic produce and get the same nutrition.

So when I see that puny looking and bruised organic fuji apple, I think about just how CONCENTRATED the nutrition is compared to a large conventional apple. This is also evident in the taste and color, which is a tell tale sign of the nutritional content. As a chef and nutritionist, I think thats what is really important!

Plus you must consider what you aren't getting. You aren't getting dangerous GMO's,  toxic chemicals, and petrochemical fertilzers that lead to soil stripped of its nutrients and pollute the local and global environment. Shall I go on...

Its tough but, I think its part of our responsiblity as consumers to keep those things in mind EVERYTIME we purchase something.

Hope this helps
Tell me what you eat, and I'll tell you what you will become!

Offline DeniseM

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Re: Whole Foods Market debate
« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2008, 08:54:23 PM »
Everyone should read (if they haven't already) Michael Pollens' Omnivores Dilemma.
He does his research and his book is full of interesting stuff.  And though the organic market has become another form of agribusiness the benefits I think still out weigh the negative.  Except when it comes to the amount of fossil fuels it takes to transport the supposed organic food from Mexico, Chile or whereever it comes from to get to our lovely Whole Foods Market.  I will still support Whole Foods over Waldemar any day.  But the better answer is to support our local farms or better yet, grow your own!

Offline AmyG

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Re: Whole Foods Market debate
« Reply #7 on: February 23, 2008, 03:15:06 PM »
I live in Hawaii, a state where up to 80% of all foodstuffs are imported. Considering Hawaii is the most isolated land mass in the world, it takes at least a 2,500 mile journey for anything to get here. I've worked in two health food stores on the island of Maui and almost all of the organic and non-organic produce comes from California. Not because there is a lack of local farmers on the island, but because it's easier and cheaper to get it from the mainland.
I am lucky in the sense that I work on local organic and bio-dynamic farms so good food is easily accesible to me. Unfortunatly for the average consumer, the only options are the local farmer's markets, which does not draw the same crowds. There has been more of a push to buy locally and not be so dependant on outside sources, but this has been a slow process as most of the land is taken up by sugarcane, pineapple, golf courses and multi million dollar homes.

Offline blujay

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Re: Whole Foods Market debate
« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2008, 12:59:16 AM »
I've lately got the impression that this movement to know where our food is coming from and the quality is due to our need for healthy connections. Which is just a symptom of the problem, like most deep disorders. This is something that our modern day lifestyles and ignorance has brought us. Unhealthy lifestyle=Unhealthy food=Illness. And like most deep disorders, if we just treat the symptoms (the desire for healthy food), it will only perpetuate the cause (unbalanced, disconnected, ambivalent life) and produce no lasting change.

I'm not suggesting that everyone sell their BMW, buy some tie-dye and volunteer on a farm. But that we question our role in the food system we chose to participate in, and consider the full impact of our choices for the good of everyone involved and not just be guided by our thrifty and selfish appetites. If we are willing to be honest with the facts and connections (or disconnections) we find, then it can be a powerful catalyst for personal, social and environmental change.  This is the sentiment that I've had for some time, and Micheal Pollen and his books have clearly portrayed this reality.
Tell me what you eat, and I'll tell you what you will become!